A simple cannabis infused coconut salve was the very first remedy I ever made at home, and it’s been a go-to in my apothecary cupboard ever since. The reason it’s a favorite is simple, it can be used on its own or in combination with other applications. It can be used as a topical or […]

 In Education

A simple cannabis infused coconut salve was the very first remedy I ever made at home, and it’s been a go-to in my apothecary cupboard ever since.

The reason it’s a favorite is simple, it can be used on its own or in combination with other applications. It can be used as a topical or ingested. It replaces butter in baking and cooking. You can even dose your pet with it by rubbing a little on Fido or Fifi’s gums, or mix it in their foods. It’s an incredibly versatile product.

My smoking tray always holds a small tub of coconut cannabis salve, as its uses are needed daily – bug bites, cuts, bruises, swelling, pain, sun burns, and skin tags are all helped with this simple salve.

Though I make it with an organic, coconut solid, I’ve melted it down and added it to over-the-counter lotions and skin treatments, as well.

According to the National Museum of American History, Americans have used salves and lotions medicinally for centuries. Salve was first documented in in the colonies in the 1800s, noting that many women made their own at home, using recipes handed down through generations – brought to the new country by apothecaries of Great Britain.

During the 19th Century skin treatments evolved from medical applications to helping a woman look youthful. Sadly, that trend continues today, but the history of the treatments, as well as the initial recipes were based on healing, not appearance.

In the cannabis community, topicals are serious remedies, used in conjunction with ingesting and smoking, for what is called “the entourage effect,” with each remedy complimenting the other and increasing efficacy.

I practice the entourage effect daily, combining topical use of salve, with smoking, and ingesting my many deliveries throughout the day – both psychoactive and non-psychoactive.

Important to note, topical use alone, even if the THC is activated, will not give a psychoactive effect, or “high.”

If you are going to ingest a cannabis coconut salve for help with sleep, start with a small amount, such as a quarter teaspoon about an hour before bedtime to feel its effects. If you are using chamomile to induce sleep, start with a half a teaspoon an hour before bedtime.

I’ve also ingested the chamomile coconut in small amounts for a calming effect to treat anxiety. Personal trials are key to finding your dose. “Start low and go slow,” is the mantra.

Simple Coconut Salve

One-part plant material to three parts organic coconut solid, adjusting amounts, as needed for strength.

Crock-pot method

Add ground cannabis to crock-pot (stems, leaves, flower) with organic coconut solid

Cook on low for three to four hours, stirring often

Note: It’s hard to judge a low setting on a crock-pot. The main thing is, you don’t want it to burn. It’s alright to turn it off and let it set to cool down, then start it up again.

Strain with cheese cloth and put into containers.

Magical Butter Machine method

Add all ingredients to machine, choose option for temperature and time. Strain and put into containers, as above.

Option: Use chamomile flower instead of cannabis; or use half chamomile, half cannabis for a calming effect. For information on the healing effects of chamomile, visit the Apothecary page in my website, www.sharonletts.com.

Be well, know your dose to medicate not recreate. Don’t just get stoned – get educated.

Fine Print: This article is based on simple apothecary. It’s what I do at home. Other’s techniques and outcomes may vary. Always mark your products with a label, noting if the product has activated THC for safety. Keep out of reach of children and pets.  

 

4 Comments

Start typing and press Enter to search